SCIENCE IS SO COOL LIKE
"We are like dwarfs sitting on the shoulders of giants. We see more, and things that are more distant, than they did, not because our sight is superior or because we are taller than they, but because they raise us up, and by their great stature add to ours."

This tumblr's for all the great men and women of science for whom we owe our current understanding of the natural world; their achievements, their failures, and even their quirks, we celebrate them all.

For Science. For Inquiry. For Humanity.
PHOTO
asapscience:

A regal horse embryo, 85 days after inception. Gestation in humans and horses is remarkably similar looking in the beginning—horse embryos look like humans even after 30 days of existence. More photos: http://bit.ly/1cDjGyvvia photographer Tom Flack and the Smithsonian

asapscience:

A regal horse embryo, 85 days after inception. 

Gestation in humans and horses is remarkably similar looking in the beginning—horse embryos look like humans even after 30 days of existence. 

More photos: http://bit.ly/1cDjGyv

via photographer Tom Flack and the Smithsonian

PHOTO SET

trynottodrown:

Vampire Squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis)

Taxonomy: The Vampyroteuthis infernalis, literally translates to “vampire squid from hell” was first described in 1903 and was thought to be an octopus with eight arms. Subsequent sightings of it showed two additional arms were discovered tucking into pockets. It is currently, the only animal in the order Vampyromorphida, an order “in between” octopus and squid, mainly due to the addition of sensory filaments believed to be used for finding food in the deep sea.

Characteristics: V. infernalis is most commonly known for its jet-black skin, the “cape” webbed skin between the arms and eyes that appear blood red at times. It has excellent predator avoidance behavior, including the ability to invert itself, exposing suckers and cirri, making it look as though it is covered in spines. V. infernalis also has light organs on the tip of each arm and at the base of its fins. The animal will begin to glow and wiggle about while also expelling mucus containing “thousands of glowing spheres of blue bioluminescent light.” While this mucus is being expelled, the vampire squid escapes.

Size: Average size for V. infernalis is between 25 – 30 cm (9-12 inches). For its size, the vampire squid has the largest eyes of any animal in the world; approximately the size of a wolf or full-grown dog.

Distribution and habitat: V. infernalis lives in the oxygen minimum layer (600-800 m depth) because it is highly effective at removing oxygen from the water due to a pigment that easily binds oxygen (hemocyanin). It also has a very low metabolic rate and high gill surface areas. Specimens have been collected from tropical and subtopical waters worldwide.

Photos: (1,2)

(via the-science-llama)

PHOTO SET

Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music." | Betrand Russell

(Source: nicconoh, via likeaphysicist)

PHOTO
the-science-llama:

Mushrooms “Make their own wind” to spread spores
The wind is created by evaporating moisture off the surface of the mushroom. Evaporation creates dense cold air, which flows and spreads out, and water-vapor — which is less dense than air — giving its spores some lift to eventually be carried a few inches (~4 inches) away. This is important since many fungi don’t grow tall enough to pass the very still air next to the ground called the “boundary layer”. There are other methods of spore dispersal to get past this boundary layer, some launch their spores at high speeds like the Pilobolus……others may just use the wind or passing animals. Here is an example of a “puffball” spore dispersal as raindrops hit and release spores into the air.

Read more: SciAm, Herbarium

the-science-llama:

Mushrooms “Make their own wind” to spread spores

The wind is created by evaporating moisture off the surface of the mushroom. Evaporation creates dense cold air, which flows and spreads out, and water-vapor — which is less dense than air — giving its spores some lift to eventually be carried a few inches (~4 inches) away. This is important since many fungi don’t grow tall enough to pass the very still air next to the ground called the “boundary layer”. There are other methods of spore dispersal to get past this boundary layer, some launch their spores at high speeds like the Pilobolus…

…others may just use the wind or passing animals. Here is an example of a “puffball” spore dispersal as raindrops hit and release spores into the air.

Read more: SciAm, Herbarium

QUOTE
— Edward Robert Harrison (via sci-universe)

(via shychemist)


PHOTO
chewmark:

astronaut reach constraints 

chewmark:

astronaut reach constraints 

(via shychemist)

PHOTO
currentsinbiology:

Fruit Fly Compound Eye
Mr. Tomasz Szul
Birmingham, AL, USA
Technique: Fluorescence

currentsinbiology:

Fruit Fly Compound Eye

Mr. Tomasz Szul

Birmingham, AL, USA

Technique: Fluorescence

(via shychemist)

PHOTO SET

unusuallytypical:

 Amazing Photos of Animals Congregating

  1. Monarch Butterflies
  2. Stingrays
  3. Bats
  4. Elephants
  5. Flamingos
  6. King Penguins
  7. Snow Geese
  8. Sardines
  9. Wildebeest
  10. Long-tailed Ducks

(via staceythinx)

PHOTO SET

sagansense:

Photos from my Trip to the Cincinnati Museum Center’s Natural History Museum exhibits and Ultimate Dinosaurs exhibits

1.  Austroraptor cabazai

2.  Giganotosaurus carolinii

3.  Suchomimus tenerensis

4.  Masaikasaurus knopfleri

5. Carnotaurus sastrei & Amargasaurus cazaui

6.  Cryolophosaurus ellioti

7.  Buitreraptor gonzalezorum

8.  Prestosuchus chiniquensis & Eoraptor lunensis

9.  Dunkleosteus terrelli

10. Xiphactinus audax

via alfarosaurus

PHOTO SET

the-star-stuff:

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries

Created in collaboration with the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, Evolution is an extraodinary collection of images by photographer Patrick Gries