SCIENCE IS SO COOL LIKE
"We are like dwarfs sitting on the shoulders of giants. We see more, and things that are more distant, than they did, not because our sight is superior or because we are taller than they, but because they raise us up, and by their great stature add to ours."

This tumblr's for all the great men and women of science for whom we owe our current understanding of the natural world; their achievements, their failures, and even their quirks, we celebrate them all.

For Science. For Inquiry. For Humanity.
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sagansense:

Vintage Space Art.

via sci-universe

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ironinomicon:

mineralists:

RhodochrositeHuachocolpa Mine, Peru

wow it’s a rock made out of roses this is soft grunge as fuck

ironinomicon:

mineralists:

Rhodochrosite
Huachocolpa Mine, Peru

wow it’s a rock made out of roses this is soft grunge as fuck

(via shychemist)

PHOTO SET

wolverxne:

Coalition

A lone male lion rarely makes it on his own. To survive—and to father cubs—a male needs an ally, one that will help him take over a pride and hold it long enough to father cubs and protect them into adulthood. Coalitions, as these alliances are called, can consist of several lions and may become powerful enough to control more than one pride. The relationship between the males in a coalition is intense and may last a lion’s lifetime.

By Michael Nichols

Footage | How to save a lion

(via shychemist)

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pervocracy:

Plesiosaur vertebra, fossilized as opal.

pervocracy:

Plesiosaur vertebra, fossilized as opal.

(via shychemist)

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asapscience:

Goats have rectangular pupils. With dilated pupils, expanding the horizontal slit of their pupil to make it a rectangle, goats can see up to 320 degrees without turning their head. Humans can see just 210 degrees max.

asapscience:

Goats have rectangular pupils. 

With dilated pupils, expanding the horizontal slit of their pupil to make it a rectangle, goats can see up to 320 degrees without turning their head. Humans can see just 210 degrees max.

(via shychemist)

PHOTO SET

realmonstrosities:

The Shame-faced Crab looks ridiculous with its huge, armoured skirt and gigantic, face-covering claws…

But their appearance belies a remarkable ability to disappear beneath the seabed in seconds, leaving nothing but a pair of eyes poking up out of the floor.

Video source

(via shychemist)

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rhamphotheca:

The Atlantic horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, is a chelicerate arthropod. Despite its name, it is more closely related to spiders, ticks, and scorpions than to crabs.  The population of horseshoe crabs has declined dramatically in recent decades. They are harvested in very large numbers for use as eel and conch bait and have also been used extensively in the biomedical industry for the manufacture of surgical sutures, making dressings for burn victims, in eye research, and in the detection of bacterial toxins and diseases. More about this species: Encyclopedia of LifeImage by Tracy Barbaro via iNaturalist.org 

rhamphotheca:

The Atlantic horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, is a chelicerate arthropod. Despite its name, it is more closely related to spiders, ticks, and scorpions than to crabs.

The population of horseshoe crabs has declined dramatically in recent decades. They are harvested in very large numbers for use as eel and conch bait and have also been used extensively in the biomedical industry for the manufacture of surgical sutures, making dressings for burn victims, in eye research, and in the detection of bacterial toxins and diseases.

More about this species: Encyclopedia of Life

Image by Tracy Barbaro via iNaturalist.org 

(via shychemist)

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malformalady:

A rare photo of a moray eel’s pelagic larvae, called a leptocephalus, or small head. The head is not visible in this photo.
Photo credit: Jerry Powell

malformalady:

A rare photo of a moray eel’s pelagic larvae, called a leptocephalus, or small head. The head is not visible in this photo.

Photo credit: Jerry Powell

(via shychemist)

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rhamphotheca:

Spiky-Headed Sharks Survived Mass Extinction, Surprising Scientists
An exotic, ancient shark thrived into the age of dinosaurs, study says.
by Dan Vergano
A family of small sharks—some of which had spiky heads—cruised the ancient seas for far longer than scientists had suspected, surviving to about 120 million years ago. Their surprising survival suggests that deep oceans sheltered predators during past mass extinctions.
Some 252 million years ago, roughly 90 percent of the planet’s marine species perished in the Permian-Triassic mass extinction event.
Tied to everything from volcanic eruptions to ocean oxygen depletion to severe climate change, the Great Dying represents the most severe challenge to life’s survival seen in the fossil record…
(read more: National Geo)
illustration by Alain Beneteau, 2013

rhamphotheca:

Spiky-Headed Sharks Survived Mass Extinction, Surprising Scientists

An exotic, ancient shark thrived into the age of dinosaurs, study says.

by Dan Vergano

A family of small sharks—some of which had spiky heads—cruised the ancient seas for far longer than scientists had suspected, surviving to about 120 million years ago. Their surprising survival suggests that deep oceans sheltered predators during past mass extinctions.

Some 252 million years ago, roughly 90 percent of the planet’s marine species perished in the Permian-Triassic mass extinction event.

Tied to everything from volcanic eruptions to ocean oxygen depletion to severe climate change, the Great Dying represents the most severe challenge to life’s survival seen in the fossil record…

(read more: National Geo)

illustration by Alain Beneteau, 2013

(via shychemist)

PHOTO SET

dieselotherapy:

Ventricular Tachycardia (V-Tach)

Ventricular Tachycardia is a dysrhythmia that usually originates from a single site within the ventricles at a rate greater than 100 bpm. The QRS complex is wide, bizarre and >0.12 seconds. As the heart rate increases, the ventricles do not have the opportunity to completely empty and refill. Therefore, cardiac output is decreased and adequate amounts of blood are not circulated to vital organs. Once the heart rate exceeds 160 impulses per minute, there is usually no effective pumping action of the heart and the patient presents with PULSELESS V-Tach. This patient requires immediate defibrillation. It is possible to have a pulse with V-Tach, however this will degrade into a life threatening dysrhythmia if left untreated.

 Ventricular Fibrillation (V-Fib)

With V-Fib there are many impulses initiated from many locations within the ventricles. As a result the cardiac output is nonexistent and the patient will not have a pulse. The fibrillation may be fine or course waves. As the amplitude of fibrillation waves decreases so does the chance of successful defibrillation and reorganization of a viable perfusing rhythm.

(via square-pegs-in-round-holes)