SCIENCE IS SO COOL LIKE
"We are like dwarfs sitting on the shoulders of giants. We see more, and things that are more distant, than they did, not because our sight is superior or because we are taller than they, but because they raise us up, and by their great stature add to ours."

This tumblr's for all the great men and women of science for whom we owe our current understanding of the natural world; their achievements, their failures, and even their quirks, we celebrate them all.

For Science. For Inquiry. For Humanity.
LINK

(via edwardianchemist-deactivated201)

PHOTO SET

centralscience:

Hemerythrin and Hemocyanin, two alternative carriers of O2 in blood

Hemerythrin is used primarily by invertebrates (marine worms, often) and hemocyanin by mollusks and crustaceans.

Hemocyanin (hemo = blood + cyanin = blue) is blue in its oxygenated form; which means that lobsters and octopuses have blue blood.

Hemerythrin (erythrin = red) is pink/purple when oxygenated.

Perhaps cooler though, is that both hemerythrin and hemocyanin are colourless when deoxygenated, unlike hemoglobin which is purple/blue (as you know, just look at your veins).

PHOTO
orgolouie:

ihopericksantorum.tumblr.com

orgolouie:

ihopericksantorum.tumblr.com

VIDEO

scinerds:

If someone does not like science, it’s only reasonable to conclude that they were deprived of Bill Nye the Science Guy as a child.

PHOTO

Women in Science: Fern P. Rathe
by Smithsonian Institution
The photo above is a picture of (left to right) Fern P. Rathe, Karl August Folkers, and Edward Anthony Kaczka. Merck Pharmaceuticals Company researchers and organic chemists Fern P. Rathe, Karl August Folkers (1906-1997), and Edward Anthony Kaczka (b. 1914) were the first to isolate the antibiotic cathomycin in 1955.

Women in Science: Fern P. Rathe

by Smithsonian Institution

The photo above is a picture of (left to right) Fern P. Rathe, Karl August Folkers, and Edward Anthony Kaczka. Merck Pharmaceuticals Company researchers and organic chemists Fern P. Rathe, Karl August Folkers (1906-1997), and Edward Anthony Kaczka (b. 1914) were the first to isolate the antibiotic cathomycin in 1955.

(via mapmeoblivion-deactivated201206)

PHOTO
Penguinone.
Because 3,4,4,5-tetramethylcyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-one doesn’t really roll off the tongue. Well, that, and the fact that it kinda looks like a penguin.

Penguinone.

Because 3,4,4,5-tetramethylcyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-one doesn’t really roll off the tongue. Well, that, and the fact that it kinda looks like a penguin.

(via theehokeypokey)

PHOTO
shychemist:

pearls-and-machine-guns:

Useful picture that would have been great to have when learning this stuff.
Thanks Wikipedia.

Good stuff to know if you’re in Organic Chemistry. ^^^

shychemist:

pearls-and-machine-guns:

Useful picture that would have been great to have when learning this stuff.

Thanks Wikipedia.

Good stuff to know if you’re in Organic Chemistry. ^^^

(Source: redcargoodpoint)

PHOTO

(Source: i-v-n)

VIDEO

skepttv:

The Chemistry of Antibiotics

Recently Jonas found a tick on his shoulder. A couple of days later, a large red ring appeared around the place where the tick had been. The ring is a clear symptom of Lyme disease caused by a bacterium called Borrelia that is transferred by ticks. The outcome of Lyme disease can be very bad if not treated immediately, but if treated in an early stage with antibiotics the infection is easily wiped out. In this video we find out how the antibiotic really works, and why it kills only the bacteria.

(Source: 5min.com, via skeptv)

PHOTO

(Source: anothergirlinanotherplanet, via shychemist)