SCIENCE IS SO COOL LIKE
"We are like dwarfs sitting on the shoulders of giants. We see more, and things that are more distant, than they did, not because our sight is superior or because we are taller than they, but because they raise us up, and by their great stature add to ours."

This tumblr's for all the great men and women of science for whom we owe our current understanding of the natural world; their achievements, their failures, and even their quirks, we celebrate them all.

For Science. For Inquiry. For Humanity.
PHOTO

Short-tailed fruit bat (Carollia perspicillata)
Lateral (top) and ventral (bottom) views of stage 19 bat embryos as viewed by reflected light (left) or after alcian blue staining and clearing (right). 
photo by Chris Cretekos and Richard Behringer

Short-tailed fruit bat (Carollia perspicillata)

Lateral (top) and ventral (bottom) views of stage 19 bat embryos as viewed by reflected light (left) or after alcian blue staining and clearing (right). 

photo by Chris Cretekos and Richard Behringer

(via ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology)

PHOTO
ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

scipsy:

Development mouse embryo over time. I made this gif from this beautiful video.

ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

scipsy:

Development mouse embryo over time. I made this gif from this beautiful video.

PHOTO
natureofnature:

embryos of Drosophila melanogaster

natureofnature:

embryos of Drosophila melanogaster

(via ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology)

PHOTO

Xenopus laevis organizer 
These twinned Xenopus laevis embryos were generated by grafting the dorsal inductive tissue of the Spemann Organizer into the ventral region of a gastrula-stage host embryo.  An antibody stain for the epitope Tor70 (dark brown) reveals both the native and secondary notochords. 
Image(s) by Andrea Wills (2007 Woods Hole Embryology Course) 
Harland lab, UC BerkeleyXenbase 

Xenopus laevis organizer

These twinned Xenopus laevis embryos were generated by grafting the dorsal inductive tissue of the Spemann Organizer into the ventral region of a gastrula-stage host embryo.  An antibody stain for the epitope Tor70 (dark brown) reveals both the native and secondary notochords. 

Image(s) by Andrea Wills (2007 Woods Hole Embryology Course) 

Harland lab, UC Berkeley
Xenbase 

(via ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology)

PHOTO SET

Blastoderm stage Drosophila embryos

Images courtesy Nipam Patel

Top embryo: Hunchback (red), Giant (green), DAPI: nuclei (blue)

Bottom embryo: Paired (red), DAPI: nuclei (blue)

more information on Drosophila development 

(via ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology)

PHOTO
ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

biomedicalephemera:

8 mm long and 10 mm long embryos with spina bifida
To get an idea how long that is, a pinhead is appx 1 mm across. One of those ubiquitous tiny red ants is 5 mm long, on average. 
You can see here that the neural tube is created VERY early on pregnancy, which is why folic acid (critical to the cell signaling which closes the neural groove) is recommended for all women of childbearing age - this stage of pregnancy is often before the woman even knows she’s pregnant, and if the pregnancy is carried to term, the lack of a single vitamin can lead to lifelong ramifications for the offspring.
For those who are into embryology/developmental biology: You can see the dorsal differences between Carnegie stages 15 and 16 if you look at these two embryos. The caudal neural pore has not yet attempted to close at all in the smaller of the two, and there are also only 3 pharyngeal arches clearly visible. In the larger of the embryos, a telling factor of which stage it’s in is that you can clearly differentiate the thigh, leg, and foot parts of the hind limb buds. 
A Study of the Causes Underlying the Origin of Human Monsters. Franklin P. Mall, 1908.

ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

biomedicalephemera:

8 mm long and 10 mm long embryos with spina bifida

To get an idea how long that is, a pinhead is appx 1 mm across. One of those ubiquitous tiny red ants is 5 mm long, on average. 

You can see here that the neural tube is created VERY early on pregnancy, which is why folic acid (critical to the cell signaling which closes the neural groove) is recommended for all women of childbearing age - this stage of pregnancy is often before the woman even knows she’s pregnant, and if the pregnancy is carried to term, the lack of a single vitamin can lead to lifelong ramifications for the offspring.

For those who are into embryology/developmental biology: You can see the dorsal differences between Carnegie stages 15 and 16 if you look at these two embryos. The caudal neural pore has not yet attempted to close at all in the smaller of the two, and there are also only 3 pharyngeal arches clearly visible. In the larger of the embryos, a telling factor of which stage it’s in is that you can clearly differentiate the thigh, leg, and foot parts of the hind limb buds. 

A Study of the Causes Underlying the Origin of Human Monsters. Franklin P. Mall, 1908.

PHOTO
ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

victoriousvocabulary:

DEVELOP
1. to bring out the capabilities or possibilities of; bring to a more advanced or effective state.
2. to cause to grow or expand.
3. to elaborate or expand in detail.
4. to bring into being or activity; generate; evolve.
5. to undergo developing, as in photographic film.
6. to progress from an embryonic to an adult form. 

ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

victoriousvocabulary:

DEVELOP

1. to bring out the capabilities or possibilities of; bring to a more advanced or effective state.

2. to cause to grow or expand.

3. to elaborate or expand in detail.

4. to bring into being or activity; generate; evolve.

5. to undergo developing, as in photographic film.

6. to progress from an embryonic to an adult form. 

PHOTO
ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

victoriousvocabulary:

 EMBRYO
1. an organism in its early stages of development, especially before it has reached a distinctively recognizable form.
2. an organism at any time before full development, birth, or hatching.
3. the fertilized egg of a vertebrate animal following cleavage.
4. in humans, the prefetal product of conception from implantation through the eighth week of development.

ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

victoriousvocabulary:

 EMBRYO

1. an organism in its early stages of development, especially before it has reached a distinctively recognizable form.

2. an organism at any time before full development, birth, or hatching.

3. the fertilized egg of a vertebrate animal following cleavage.

4. in humans, the prefetal product of conception from implantation through the eighth week of development.