SCIENCE IS SO COOL LIKE
"We are like dwarfs sitting on the shoulders of giants. We see more, and things that are more distant, than they did, not because our sight is superior or because we are taller than they, but because they raise us up, and by their great stature add to ours."

This tumblr's for all the great men and women of science for whom we owe our current understanding of the natural world; their achievements, their failures, and even their quirks, we celebrate them all.

For Science. For Inquiry. For Humanity.
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sci-fact:


This year’s peak Arctic ice melt was the greatest since records have been kept, and is thought to be the greatest in a million years. The animation above shows January through September of 2012. The dark area represents the historic daily average. The final frame displays this year’s minimum of 4 million square kilometers as compared with the average of 7 million.

sci-fact:

This year’s peak Arctic ice melt was the greatest since records have been kept, and is thought to be the greatest in a million years. The animation above shows January through September of 2012. The dark area represents the historic daily average. The final frame displays this year’s minimum of 4 million square kilometers as compared with the average of 7 million.

(via astrotastic)

VIDEO

jtotheizzoe:

It’s getting hot in hurr …

This NASA animation of temperature data from 1880-2011 shows the shift upward in normal global temperatures. The more red you see, the higher the deviation from the historical average.

So much red.

Show this to anyone left that argues that this isn’t actually happening, which would be pretty hard to believe, actually. I think the real question some people have a problem with today is “Why?

Well, science points to the cause being us. Here’s a great feature from New Scientist to answer some of your curious or skeptical questions, and to help you learn more about the causes of climate change.

(via ClimateDesk)

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rationalhub:

Sounds about right.

rationalhub:

Sounds about right.

LINK

jtotheizzoe:

The next summer blockbuster? CLIMATE CHANGE, 3-D!!

… these guys are good. You’d almost swear this is what global warming looks like, since it’s exactly what scientists have been predicting for decades. Indeed, the head of the nation’s climate data center, in Asheville, N.C., used the kind of scary language we’ve come to expect from climate alarmists, calling the record–breaking week “a super-heated spike on top of a decades-long warming trend.”

That’s why it would be so scary if it wasn’t a hoax. But it must be, because if it was a real crisis, responsible authorities would be taking action. The president wouldn’t be approving new oil drilling in the Arctic on the very same week. The Interior Secretary wouldn’t be auctioning off a vast new store of coal. The Republican presidential nominee wouldn’t be promising to approve the Keystone pipeline to the vast tarsands of Canada as his very first order of business.


Funny, but in that really, really sad way.

VIDEO

Professional vlogger, entrepreneur, environmental scientist, and all around really cool guy Hank Green gives us a humorous, informative, and slightly morbid rundown of the 5 scariest things that could happen/are probably already happening as a result of climate change.

From rising sea levels to mass extinctions, Hank walks us through what could go wrong with increasing global temperature by even a few degrees.

EVERYTHING

And while climate change deniers will still be all:

and humans will continue being the Scumbag Steve of planetary roommates (don’t even pretend like we aren’t), it’s nice to know there’s people like Hank Green who are working tirelessly to bring awareness to the masses and save us from our own stupidity.

For more on climate change effects, as well as to how we can lessen our impact technologically, visit Hank’s eco-blog ecogeek.org

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discoverynews:

Wild Drill Monkeys Unable to Deal With Warming Climate
Monkeys called wild drills, already an overhunted species, may see a dramatic population decline if their forest home dries out and vegetation becomes sparser amid warming temperatures, researchers report.
keep reading

discoverynews:

Wild Drill Monkeys Unable to Deal With Warming Climate

Monkeys called wild drills, already an overhunted species, may see a dramatic population decline if their forest home dries out and vegetation becomes sparser amid warming temperatures, researchers report.

keep reading

LINK

astrotastic:

Neil DeGrasse Tyson is an astrophysicist and director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History. He is the go-to scientist for many late night hosts, including Stephen Colbert and Bill Maher. He is going to be hosting the reboot of the late Carl Sagan‘s popular TV series Cosmos. These and many other reasons are why you’d want to listen to Tyson when he starts talking about science. And during tonight’s episode of Real Time, he patiently tried to explain the science behind global warming.

That was great.

(Source: fucknopseudoscience)

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senorpyjamapants:

tissue2:

posting without comment

senorpyjamapants:

tissue2:

posting without comment

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jtotheizzoe:

Today in “We Are Completely Screwed” Climate Change News: May Bring Big Ecosystem Changes
The map above shows predicted ecosystem shifts (like a complete change of type, forest -> grassland) for the year 2100 based on current climate change models.

By 2100, global climate change will modify plant communities covering almost half of Earth’s land surface and will drive the conversion of nearly 40 percent of land-based ecosystems from one major ecological community type - such as forest, grassland or tundra - toward another …
(via NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory)

jtotheizzoe:

Today in “We Are Completely Screwed” Climate Change News: May Bring Big Ecosystem Changes

The map above shows predicted ecosystem shifts (like a complete change of type, forest -> grassland) for the year 2100 based on current climate change models.

By 2100, global climate change will modify plant communities covering almost half of Earth’s land surface and will drive the conversion of nearly 40 percent of land-based ecosystems from one major ecological community type - such as forest, grassland or tundra - toward another …

(via NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory)

(via jtotheizzoe)

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scinerds:

Hyperwarming Climate Could Turn Earth’s Poles Green
An Era of ice that has gripped Earth’s poles for 35 million years could come to an end as extreme global warming really begins to bite. Previously unknown sources of positive feedback - including “hyperwarming” that was last seen on Earth half a billion years ago - may push global temperatures high enough to send Earth into a hothouse state with tropical forests growing close to the poles.
Climate scientists typically limit themselves to the 21st century when predicting how human activity will affect global temperatures. The latest predictions are bolder, though: the first systematic forecasts through to 2300 are beginning to arrive.
They follow four possible futures, including one in which we rapidly cut emissions and another in which we burn fossil fuels into the 22nd century (Climatic Change, DOI: 10.1007/s10584-011-0157-y).
Chris Jones of the UK Met Office in Exeter says that unpublished results suggest the “burn everything” scenario could see atmospheric carbon dioxide levels reach 2000 parts per million - the figure today is 388 ppm. That pulse of CO2 could lead to a global temperature rise of 10 °C.
Temperatures this high were last seen in the Eocene, 34 million years ago, says Paul Pearson of Cardiff University in the UK. Conditions were so different back then that the Canadian High Arctic was populated by plants that are now found in the south-eastern US (Proceedings of the Royal Society B, DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2011.1704).

scinerds:

Hyperwarming Climate Could Turn Earth’s Poles Green

An Era of ice that has gripped Earth’s poles for 35 million years could come to an end as extreme global warming really begins to bite. Previously unknown sources of positive feedback - including “hyperwarming” that was last seen on Earth half a billion years ago - may push global temperatures high enough to send Earth into a hothouse state with tropical forests growing close to the poles.

Climate scientists typically limit themselves to the 21st century when predicting how human activity will affect global temperatures. The latest predictions are bolder, though: the first systematic forecasts through to 2300 are beginning to arrive.

They follow four possible futures, including one in which we rapidly cut emissions and another in which we burn fossil fuels into the 22nd century (Climatic Change, DOI: 10.1007/s10584-011-0157-y).

Chris Jones of the UK Met Office in Exeter says that unpublished results suggest the “burn everything” scenario could see atmospheric carbon dioxide levels reach 2000 parts per million - the figure today is 388 ppm. That pulse of CO2 could lead to a global temperature rise of 10 °C.

Temperatures this high were last seen in the Eocene, 34 million years ago, says Paul Pearson of Cardiff University in the UK. Conditions were so different back then that the Canadian High Arctic was populated by plants that are now found in the south-eastern US (Proceedings of the Royal Society B, DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2011.1704).